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Memories of  The Great War

Washington's  WW1  Volunteers


The First Washington Men to Volunteer for WW1 Service

Volunteer Record Front Page

 

The First Washington Men to Volunteer for WW1 Service

Volunteer Record Page 2

 

The First Washington Men to Volunteer for WW1 Service

Volunteer Record Page 3

 

The First Washington Men to Volunteer for WW1 Service

Volunteer Record Page 4

 

Miner Samuel Tulip

( One of Washington's First Volunteers )

Sam Tulip - Pit Lad
14th Birthday & First Day at Washington 'F' Pit.

Sam Tulip with his Dog
Young 'F' Pit Miner

Sam was a typical Washington Lad.

[ Many thanks to Granddaughter Vivienne Bell, née Gill, for making Sam's photographs & documents available. ]

Private Samuel Tulip

( One of Washington's First Volunteers )

Sam Tulip - Soldier 2
Private Samuel Tulip No.18477

Sam Tulip - Soldier 1
The Border Regiment, WW1, 1914-1918

Sam joined The Border Regiment at the age of 22.

[ Sam's name appears on Page 3 ( Tab 3/4 above ) of the Washington & District Volunteer Record, dated 11th September 1914. ]

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Lulworth Camp, Dorset

( Postcard Home )

Postcard Picture: Sam Tulip at Lulworth Army Camp
Private Samuel Tulip at Lulworth Camp
[ Sam is second from the left, front row. ]

Postcard Message: Sam Tulip at Lulworth Army Camp
Message to Sam's Mother
Post Mark:   WEST LULWORTH, 19 OC 14

Dear Mother
I am sorry I have not
written before now. But
I am still keeping well
and fit with the sea
air at Lulworth Camp.
You will know my address.
Love to all.
From Sam

Mrs Wood
1 Under Hill Terrace
Springwell
Wrekenton
Gateshead on Tyne
County Durham

 

[ Sam's mother married again following the death of his father. ]

•   •   ◊   •   •

Sam Seriously Wounded!

At an unknown date, during his tour of duty in France, Sam was seriously injured by a sniper's bullet.
He was shot in the right side of his neck and the bullet exited beneath his left shoulder blade.
His injuries were so severe that he was sent home to Washington to aid his recovery.
His wounds left him with heavy scarring, but his war wasn't over yet!

Sam Tulip - Army Cookery 'ticket'
POST-INJURY TRAINING
When Sam recovered sufficiently from his injuries, he trained as an Army Cook.
He then returned to France to complete his service.

[ N.B. Sam's I.D. Number was 18477, not 78477. ]

Samuel Tulip

( Veteran of The Great War )

Sam and Mary Tulip
Sam & Mary Tulip of 40, Tyne Gardens
They married 3rd September 1921.

Sam Tulip (b. Blackfell, 1892-1972) with his wife Mary Ann née Robson (b. Usworth, 1898-1970).

In his retirement Sam enjoyed repairing clocks & watches and he was an expert domino player.

 

Private Samuel Tulip's WW1 Medals and Mary Tulip
Sam Tulip's WW1 Medals

Having been treasured by Sam's eldest daughter, Lillian Storey, the display case
and documents will be handed down to one of his great-great-grandchildren.

•   •   ◊   •   •

Certificate of Demobilization

( Transfer to Army Reserve )

Private Samuel Tulip's demobilization card

When WW1 ended, Private Samuel Tulip returned to Washington 'F' Pit where he
worked as an underground Wagonwayman.  He suffered a further
serious injury when he was caught between two tubs.
When Sam recovered he returned to work.

•   •   ◊   •   •

' A Granda To Be Proud Of '

Vivienne & Jim

Private William Forster

( One of Washington's First Volunteers )

Inscription - William Forster
The Last Resting Place of Private William Forster - St Sever Cemetery, Rouen, France.
William lived at 25, Pattinson Town, Washington Station.

[ Thanks to Photographer: Peter Welsh ]

William Forster was born at Barmston, enlisted at Washington Station and became Private 14003, 8th Battalion, Yorkshire Regiment.  The Washington and District Volunteer Record printed a list of local men who had volunteered by 8th September 1914 - see Tab 'Volunteers 1/4'.  One of these men was William Forster of 25, Pattinson Town.  He arrived in France on 26th August 1915, died of wounds in No 1 Stationary Hospital, Rouen, on 14th August 1916 and was buried in St Sever Cemetery, location: B 31 20.

The Illustrated Chronicle of 4th September 1916 reported the death of Private W. Forster, Yorkshire Regiment, and on the 6th, stated that he had died of wounds and was a resident of Washington Station.  William left a widow, Ellen, living at 25, Pattinson Town and his 1915 Star, War and Victory medals would have been sent to her.  In the list of Soldiers’ Effects, released in 2016, the army noted that Ellen, William’s widow, received £4.3.8d on 24th November 1916 and a further war gratuity of £9 was paid on 1st October 1919.  The average payment was £10.35, equivalent to £929 in today’s money.

The 1891 Census recorded the Forster Family as living at 3, Pattinson Town i.e. Joseph, Jane, Amelia, John and William (aged 1).  The 1901 Census recorded the Forsters still living at 3, Pattinson Town - Joseph (39), a cooper in a magnesium factory (Washington Chemical Works), his wife Jane (36), John (14), working as a cartman, and his young brother, William (11). Mr and Mrs Forster were born at Felling and Whitehaven, respectfully.  In 1911 the family, minus John, but with the addition of Amelia (25), were living at 8, Pattinson Town, Washington.  John doesn’t appear to be listed in the 1911 Census.  William was a general labourer at the Chemical Works.

Given the enormous extent of the fighting in July 1916 it’s hard to say with any certainty when William Forster was wounded.  The 8th Yorkshires were in and out of the line on the Somme front, near Albert, early in August; working parties were provided and some of that work was in salvaging equipment.  They also had a spell in billets in Rue Bapaume, Albert, and had a day off with 'bathing', which wasn’t always in a sweet smelling bath house or well-appointed pool.  On the 5th they were back in the line and under orders to capture 100 yards of Munster Trench and to clear Torr Trench.  The attack was regarded as 'quite successful'.  William died on 14th August 1916, aged 26.  By the 17th August his regiment had been transferred to Bailleul and then Steenwercke, near Ypres.

The Roll of Honour drawn up for Washington and Barmston Parishes included William Forster and gave his address as 25, Pattinson Town.  This seems to be the list from which the names on the Washington War Memorial were carved.

[ William's name appears on Page 2 ( Tab 2/4 above ) of the Washington & District Volunteer Record, dated 11th September 1914. ]

[ I'm reliably informed that there’s going to be a street at Teal Farm named after Private William Forster. ]

___________

Private John Douglas Forster

( William's Older Brother )

Inscription - John D. Forster
The Last Resting Place of Private John Douglas Forster - Dozinghem, Belgium.
John lived at 8, Pattinson Town, Washington Station.

[ Thanks to Photographer: Peter Welsh ]

John Douglas Forster was 14 years old and working as a cartman, when the 1901 Census recorded him living at 3, Pattinson Town with his father Joseph, mother Jane and younger brother, William (11).  He doesn’t appear to be listed in the 1911 Census.

John enlisted in Shiney Row as 14376, Reserve Cavalry Regiment but was transferred to the 5th Dorsetshires and, as Private 13518, died of wounds in Belgium on 18th August 1917, aged 29.  He had arrived in the Balkans on 14th September 1915 and survived that campaign.  John is buried in Dozinghem Cemetery, Location IV B 8, in Belgium.  He was awarded the 1915 Star and the War and Victory medals.  The CWGC (Commonwealth War Graves Commission) states that his parents were Joseph and Jane of 8, Pattinson Town. In the list of Soldiers’ Effects, released in 2016, the army noted that Joseph, John’s father, received £13.9.7d on 21st December 1917 and a further war gratuity of £14 was paid on 13th November 1919.

The Battle of Langemarck (16th to 18th August 1918) was part of the Battle of Passchendaele, aka Third Ypres. Wet weather had turned parts of the battlefield into a quagmire which frustrated any hope of a breakthrough.
In the main attack, on August 16th, some things went very seriously wrong.  In the wake of a 'creeping barrage' 8 British Divisions attacked at 4.45 a.m. on a front of 12,000 yards.  There was limited success in the north but costly failure, with heavy casualties, in the centre and the south.  The British barrage had failed to destroy German batteries and barbed wire.  The Germans responded with devastating artillery and machine gun fire from pill boxes and fortified farms.  British casualties were around 15,000.

"Our casualties numbered 3 Officers and 143 Other Ranks.  18th: During the day our snipers continued to engage enemy snipers."  The 2 deaths recorded by the CWGC are those of John D Forster and Albert Hillyar, a Dorchester man.

The Roll of Honour drawn up for Washington and Barmston Parishes included John Douglas Forster and gave his address as No.8 Pattinson Town.

[ Thanks to Peter Welsh for contributing the above information and photographs. ]

Pattinson Town

Pattinson Town
Private John Douglas Forster and his younger brother, Private William Forster,
lived in Pattinson Town, close to Washington Chemical Works.

Pattinson Town
8 Years after The Great War - 1926
Pattinson Town (top-left)  -  Washington Chemical Works  -  Washington Railway Station

[ Note Washington Station Road, the Railway Footbridge, Cook's Pond, Wilden Terrace etc. ]

In 1834 Hugh Lee Pattinson FRS, in partnership with John Lee and George Burnett,
established a chemical works at Felling in Gateshead and afterwards
at Washington.  Info from Newcastle University website.

World War 1 Campaign Medals

Pip, Squeak & Wilfred
Pip, Squeak & Wilfred

Pip:  The 1914 Star  (unofficially, The Mons Star)

Awarded to those who served in France or Belgium between 5th August 1914 to midnight on 22nd November 1914.
The reverse is plain with the recipient's service number, rank, name and unit impressed on it.

Pip:  The 1914-15 Star

Awarded to those who served in any theatre of war against Germany between 5th August 1914 and 31st December 1915.
The reverse is plain with the recipient's service number, rank, name and unit impressed on it.

Squeak:  The British War Medal, 1914-20

Awarded to those who entered a theatre of war.  Those who served overseas from part of the British Empire also qualified.
The recipient's service number, rank, name and unit is impressed on the rim.

Wilfred:  The Allied Victory Medal, 1914-19

The Victory Medal was restricted to those who entered a theatre of war.
The recipient's service number, rank, name and unit is impressed on the rim.

Pip, Squeak & Wilfred: a strip cartoon published in the Daily Mirror from 1919 to 1956.

 

Dedication of Memorial Garden in Washington Village

Inscription
[ Thanks to Photographer, Tom Copeman - 3rd August 2014 ]

 

Centenary of WW1 Armistice Day

Village - 100 Years after Armistice
WASHINGTON VILLAGE MEMORIAL

Village - 100 Years after Armistice
SILHOUETTE MEMORIAL ON THE VILLAGE GREEN

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Harraton - 100 Years after Armistice
HARRATON MEMORIAL

Harraton - 100 Years after Armistice
100 YEARS SINCE ARMISTICE DAY
[ Thanks to Photographer, Keith Cockerill - 11th November 2018 ]